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The New Bedford Whaling Museum is celebrating its 21st. year with a series of illustrated lectures, tonight's lecture at 1930 is about modern piracy. The lecturer is Commander Andrew Norris USCG the representative to the International Law Department Staff. He serves as a USCG military judge as such presides over courts-martial of USCG personnel, he is also on the faculty of the Naval War College. His JD is from the University of Florida class 1993 hence the interest of NAUTICAL LOG since we also are Floridians. The lecture will cover, no doubt from the legal point-of-view, statistics on piracy, problem areas, international response, U.S. response, self-defence of U.S. Flag State vessels et cetera.

It would be fair enough if one might say talk, talk, and more talk but how about some action. This lecture should, NAUTICAL LOG believes, be very useful in understanding just what actually can be done under the Rule of Law in the 21st. Century. As we seafarers know only too well since there are 800 of us captives off Somalia about which very little has been done.

The talk has gone on for years but little action and then mostly by the navy of whose country's ship has been pirated or whose nationals are involved. One exception to this pattern is India whose Navy and Coastguard has been outstanding in patrolling, chasing down and capturing pirates.

On another point of modern piracy, which nobody has done anything about, is the violent anti-whaling and anti-bluetuna fishing actions of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (SSCS). For a decade they have harassed seafarers engaged in legal fishing and whaling without punishment. Since the good Commander is lecturing from the New Bedford Whaling Museum it might be a good location to cover this aspect of modern piracy. However we seafarers are not "holding-our-breadth" that he will address this issue. Being politically correct and a military judge the issue will, NAUTICAL LOG is quite certain, be carefully avoided. If there is a Q&A session hopefully someone will at least ask a question in relation to the nautical thuggery of SSCS. It would be nice to have the point raised and a question on record.

Meanwhile the 800 captive seafarers suffer off Somalia and does anyone really care about them - it seems not many even know they exist least of all the Greek led International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Good Watch.
Please remember the 800 seafarers captives of pirates off Somalia - let us work to free them.


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It sometimes happens that one is going to write a Post on a subject when lo and behold there is already an excellent one.  Such is the case today; so rather than repeat everything let me refer you to the source of that Post

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Good Watch.


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Good Watch.