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COMMENT WHAT?


The Internet Blogs are about every subject one could imagine and as a result the Posts in them generate comments. Unfortunately those comments fall into several categories which results in many being quite appalling both in subject matter ignorance, personal intemperate behaviour and language. In NAUTICAL LOG we have a statement as to comments but in fact usually publish the anonymous ones if they are, in our opinion, useful comments with no foul language - hey its our Blog. Actually NAUTICAL LOG does not get a large number of comments, we thought it was because we did not have a large number of readers!! However the 'SiteMeter' shows nearly 19,000 so that may not be true.

Those of you who do read NAUTICAL LOG know that we usually have plenty to say on maritime issues. We consider ourselves a maritime activist blog with opinions - opinionated perhaps? - there are other excellent maritime blogs which take the approach of forwarding published maritime articles or articles of connected interest, with perhaps additional remarks of their own. All this in turn leads of course to comments on the posts and NAUTICAL LOG itself is often one of those commenter's.

Recently there was an incident at sea, which occurred off the Senkaku Islands, between the Japan Coast Guard and a Chinese fishing vessel. These are an extension of the Japanese island chain that runs from the south island of Kyushu down to Okinawa. The Senkaku Islands are claimed by The Peoples Republic of China thus also by the island government of Taiwan. Video of the incident was published on 'YouTube' then removed by Japan then republished in a full 45 minute version which can now be seen. Many of the subsequent comments in English were deplorable, abusive racial comments on both the Chinese and Japanese peoples using foul language. Why people would resort to this type of commenting on incidents is something NAUTICAL LOG does not really understand.

The Japanese Self Defence Forces are limited by what actions they can engage in by Japan's Constitution. It appears that the Japan Coast Guard (JCG), which is not limited in this manner, has been given the mission or has developed the mission itself of enforcing Japanese honour. From this and other video of incidents they are very clearly the aggressor and were harassing the Chinese fishing vessel instead of just going alongside it and making the arrest if it was fishing illegally in the first place. Maybe their methods triggered those highly intemperate comments mentioned above, certainly the JCG methods upset the Chinese fishing boat Captain.

If you are going to comment effectively on a Post in a Blog then you must first read the subject matter properly and comment in a constructive temperate style. If not your remarks are valueless becoming a worthless often abusive rant. If you comment on a previous comment to a Post your comment should keep to the subject matter of that previous comment, do not inject a remark which that previous comment did not make.

Recently NAUTICAL LOG commented on a Post in an excellent and well known maritime Blog and had that happen, we had deliberately kept the comment generic not to pick on any particular vessel. This was because the full facts were not yet published by a Nautical Board of Inquiry. In another case a comment to a NAUTICAL LOG comment on a Post the commenter stated that they got the "whiff of health and safety" which as a former cruise ship Safety Officer amused NAUTICAL LOG because it showed a lack of nautical knowledge, the "health and safety" equipment and training is what saved those lives in the first place, as to the "whiff" it came from that commenter's bull stables!

So you now have the NAUTICAL LOG opinion on comments their style and language to be effective - opinionated perhaps - but there it is.

Good Watch.

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